Animated e-Greeting Cards Realia : Best Wishes for a speedy recovery – بالشفاء العاجل

The following is a collection of “Get well soon” e-cards from the Arabic Online community site Maktoob.com

The Arabic words and expressions written in these cards are all you need to know if you would like to wish someone a speedy recovery.

They really mean a lot to those who are feeling down or ill.

Best wishes – Wishing you a speedy recovery

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Greeting Expressions in Colloquial Egyptian Arabic

The Arabic Program at Brigham Young University is developing various internet based learning resources to supplement Arabic Language Learning.
In conjunction with Prof. Muhammad Eissa and the NMERLC, BYU is developing an Egyptian Spoken Arabic program to expose students to real spoken Arabic situations through internet video.

The segments, filmed in Alexandria, expose students to progressively more complicated social situations.

This short video clip presents different types of greetings in colloquial Egyptian Arabic.

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Watch the video

Source of realia:

National Middle East Language Resource Center

Find out more

Egyptian Arabic – Wikipedia

Colloquial Egyptian expressions

For more information on this project/resource, please contact us at nmelrc-research@byu.edu

Arabic/Islamic Greetings – Eid Mubarak عيد مبارك

Eid mubarak ( عيد مبارك) is a traditional Muslim greeting reserved for use on the festivals of Eid ul-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr.

The phrase translates into English as “blessed festival“, and can be paraphrased as “may you enjoy a blessed festival”.

Muslims wish each other Eid Mubarak after performing the Eid prayer.

This celebration continues till the end of the day. It is notable that saying these exact words is a cultural tradition influenced by deep roots of religion in it; however, it is not part of any religious obligations.

Eid refers to the occasion itself, and Mubarak is roughly ‘may it become good for you’, but the phrase is used in the same context that “Merry Christmas” would be.

Throughout the Muslim world there are numerous other ways of greeting for Eid ul-Adha and Eid ul-Fitr.

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“This (butcher) is trying to kill me!”

Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى ‘Īd ul-’Aḍḥā) is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims and Druze worldwide as a commemoration of Ibrahim’s (Abraham’s) willingness to sacrifice his son, as commanded by Allah. (Muslim tradition names Ishmael as the son who was to be sacrificed, whereas the Judeo-Christian tradition names Isaac.)

It is one of two Eid festivals celebrated by Muslims, whose basis comes from the Quran.[1] (Muslims in Iran celebrate a third, non-denominational Eid.)

Like Eid el-Fitr, Eid ul-Adha begins with a shortprayer followed by a sermon (khuṭba).

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Eid ul-Fitr ( عيد الفطر ), often abbreviated to Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. Eid is an Arabic word meaning “festivity”, while Fiṭr means “to break the fast” (and can also mean “nature”, from the word “fitrah”) and so symbolizes the breaking of the fasting period.

Eid ul-Fitr starts the day after Ramadan ends, and is verified by the sighting of the new moon. Muslims give money to the poor and wear their best clothes.

Eid ul-Fitr lasts three days and is called “The Lesser Eid” ( العيد الصغير al-‘īdu ṣ-ṣaghīr) compared with the Eid ul-Adha that lasts four days and is called “The Greater Eid” ( العيد الكبير al-‘īdu l-kabīr).

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Calligraphic signs of Eid Greetings

Best greetings and wishes for the blessed (happy) Eid

More greetings signs

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Arabic-speaking parrots!

This is an interesting video containing footage of Lulu – an Arab-speaking parrot with a native-like accent!

It was trained by a Arab person from Abu-Dhabi, in UAE over a period of four years.

His trainer taught the parrot to greet visitors to his home with “Assalamu Alaikum السلام عليكم ” and to bid them farewell with “Massalamah السلامة”

Lulu knows some Ayahs (verses) from the Qur’an namely “Surah Ikhlas” and how to make dua (i.e. prayer) for Muslim men and women – specifically asking for them to have forgiveness from God.

He also knows how to say “In the name of Allah, the most gracious the most beneficial بسم الله الرحمان الرحيم ” and “God is Great الله أكبر ”

What other words/expressions can you recognise?

How does he greet and bid farewell to his trainer’s guests?

What is the Arabic for “guests”?

When does LuLu usually offer his prayers?

How did LuLu pray for the deceased?

This second video clip shows another parrot who speaks Arabic with an asian accent. His owner, who is from Pakistan, trained the parrot to recite the Qur’an, especially Sura Al-Fatiha ( الفاتحة ) and Al-Ikhlas ( الإخلاص )

What other words/expressions can you recognise?


Postage Stamp – USA Stamp with Eid Greetings

The U.S. Postal Service is expanding its Holiday Celebrations Series with a new stamp highlighting the Muslim holiday of Eid.

The Eid stamp, designed by Zakariya of Arlington, Va., features the Arabic phrase “Eid mubarak” in gold calligraphy on a blue background. English text on the stamps reads “EID GREETINGS.”

The colors chosen for the stamp Eid al-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting, prayer and reflection. Ramadan remembers the month in A.D. 610 when Muslims believe that the prophet Muhammad received the revelations from God that would form Islam’s holy book, the Quran.

“This is a proud moment for the Postal Service, the Muslim community, and Americans in general as we issue a postage stamp to honor and commemorate two important Islamic celebrations,” said A.S. Jaffer, Public Affairs and Communications for the Postal Service, who will dedicate the stamp.

“The Eid stamp will help us highlight the business, educational and social contributions of the estimated six to seven million Muslims in this country whose cultural heritage has become an integral part of the fabric of this great nation.”